news releases

19 November 2021

Hispanic Access Foundation and USFWS Launch Recruitment for 2022 Directorate Fellows Program



Category: News Releases

Hispanic Access Foundation is partnering with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) through its MANO Project, along with Greening Youth Foundation, Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program, Thurgood Marshall College Foundation (TMCF) and American Indian for Higher Education Consortium to implement their 2022 Directorate Fellows Program (DFP). The program is an 11-week fellowship focusing on projects supporting FWS’ conservation priorities from Mid-May and June 2022 to August and September 2022.

“Latinos are the fastest growing population, and now represent 18.7 percent of the U.S. population, according to the 2020 census,” said Maite Arce, president and CEO of Hispanic Access Foundation. “However, our nation’s workforce currently does not accurately represent all diverse populations, especially in conservation. We hope DFP provides an opportunity for students from all backgrounds to gain valuable experience leading to a career in conservation.”

“The DFP is one of FWS’s best Internships programs that recruits diverse talented students interested in a career in conservation,” said Steven M. Chase, Director, USFWS National Conservation Training Center. “The DFP project assignment engages the Fellows in mission critical work in regional and field offices and at field sites, introduces them to Service employees and partners, and provides a hands-on, in-person experience that allows both the Fellow and the Service to determine career potential with the Service.”

Fellowships are a good fit for students with majors in biological sciences and natural resources. There are limited projects for students with degrees in education and outreach, social sciences/humanities, geographic and information sciences, law enforcement/ criminal justice, communications and marketing, and information technology. The type of project work may include working on species conservation planning, field surveys and monitoring for species, landscape scale conservation partnerships, environmental law and policy, education and outreach, community engagement, digital communications, etc.

“Engaging young people in diverse communities in the conservation field is one of the MANO Project’s core goals,” said Michelle Neuenschwander, Director of the MANO Project. “Our work is about the next generation of leaders. This unique experience provides extensive training, mentoring and professional development to ensure students have the tools and knowledge needed to excel in their fellowship and a career in conservation.”

Available positions are now posted and applications will be accepted until January 7, 2022 at 11:59 pm ET. For more information visit the project page at https://manoproject.org/manodfp.

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HAF improves the lives of Hispanics in the United States and promotes civic engagement by educating, motivating and helping them access trustworthy support systems.

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